Tag Archives: Hawkshead

Breweries to Watch 2013 – five months on…

At the beginning of January, just as the year started, I posted a list of British breweries to watch out for in 2013. Despite the ongoing financial pressures, the scene here is flourishing – more breweries are opening now than ever (in living memory, at least). Having said that, it’s still a tough industry in which to survive, of course – requiring long hours, hard work, and the ability to fend off constant demands of needy bloggers. Speaking of which, five months down the line from the original post, it’s time to check back with those eleven breweries, and see how they have been doing, as we approach the halfway point of the year…



SCOTLAND

Cromarty1

Cromarty Brewing Co
I pegged Cromarty Brewing Company as the brewery to watch this year, and so far Craig Middleton hasn’t let us down. His latest effort rolled off the production line on the Black Isle last week – a 2%, triple C-hopped, ‘un-stout’ (joining in with one of the brewing trends of the year; beers between 2 and 3%). Keeping up with demand has been Craig’s biggest problem to date – so the recent arrival of two 32hl and two 16hl conditioning tanks is great news for Cromarty fans. Having effectively doubled capacity at the brewery, Craig should now be set to keep a regular stock in place, secure even more accounts, and rightfully become known throughout the UK.



arranlogo

Arran Brewery
Arran Brewery MD Gerald Michaluk went all-in for 2013, having announced a merger with the Isle of Skye Brewery, and a huge expansion plan that included a mainland bottling plant, distillery and series of bespoke bars. However, the wheels came off in fairly spectacular fashion when the Scottish Government turned down his FPMC grant application. After issuing a few withering press releases, Gerald re-grouped and is blazing ahead with parts of the project anyway – although the Skye merger is off, the Falkirk Brewery is set to continue. Also, Arran cider will soon appear, as will an historic Iron Age ale, and a whey wine. Distribution has begun to the continent, and Arran have also recently become the first UK brewery (to my knowledge) to begin producing sake. ‘Nothing ventured, nothing gained’ still holds sway on Arran, clearly.



Knops

Knops Beer Co/Archerfield Fine Ales
I predicted a massive leap upwards for Bob Knops this year, as back in January he was waiting for the Archerfield Estate project to come on-line in East Lothian (with some nervousness, no doubt). Five months down the line, the brewery is there, the people are rolling in, and the beers are heading in the opposite direction. As well as the core range, for the first time in a while Knops Beer Co released a new beer under their own label; the Spring-reveal of Knops ‘Premier Bru’. The creativity that had been kept in check for so long due to the vagaries of contracting has finally being released. With a stable base from which to build – and a huge amount of physical space in which to do so – Knops are really starting to kick on and should have a hugely productive year from here onwards.



Fallen

Fallen Brewing Co
Speaking of contractor breweries, one of the half-dozen that operate in Scotland at the moment are the Fallen Brewing Company; another one-man operation getting beers out via the TSA plant in Throsk. At the moment, Paul Fallen is still in the process of getting his own brewery established – since the new year, the business plan has gone out and the multi-stranded planning applications are nestling in the appropriate pigeon-holes. Once everything comes together, expect a flood of beers to come from the Kippen plant – until then, keep watching Paul’s Twitter feed.



AlechemyBC

Alechemy Brewing
Livingston’s Alechemy Brewing Co blasted on to the scene last spring, and over the first few months of this year they show absolutely no signs of slowing down. Owner James Davies can’t get new fermenting vessels in fast enough, and has taken on new members of staff to help with the near-incessant demand. Currently, the expanded Alechemy team are busy sourcing kegging equipment to begin taking their beer in yet another direction (bottled beer having appeared a few months ago). With house beers and dedicated Alechemy taps appearing all over Edinburgh (the latest being the Bow Bar), and custom beers also increasingly prevalent – look for Alechemy’s beers to appear in England with increasing regularity. They have also even re-branded their Twitter feed



brewdog-1

BrewDog
2013 could become the key year for BrewDog, as the grace period following the opening of the new Ellon plant draws to a close, and the legions of punks look for something tangible to result. Or maybe they don’t, as the enjoyable/infuriating marketing juggernaut rolls on – spearheaded by the recently re-announced BrewDog TV show. Will ‘BrewDogs’ catapult James and Martin into the mainstream they so desperately crave? Beer releases this year have been largely positive so far, and the subtle re-shuffling of lines has moved Alice Porter and Jackhammer more towards the forefront. Similarly, will the next few months enable BrewDog to move more into more established markets, to cash in on the success of their bars? Only time will tell. Meanwhile, yesterday’s tweet from James Watt hints at yet more to come – something concrete? Or PR fluff?



ENGLAND

buxton

Buxton Brewery
Over the other side of the border, the pick of English breweries to look out for this year (in January, at any rate) was Buxton. That was largely down to their breakout 2012 – building up to a seventeen-strong lineup, with a double-figure number of standouts. Pound for pound (or barrel for barrel, really) there are few better British breweries out there. So, this year, there may have been cause for concern when they lost James Kemp, their head brewer, in April. But stepping into the Peak District Purofort’s is Colin Stronge, ex-Black Isle and Marble, and one of the most riotously inventive brewers out there. With Denis ‘Anorak’ Johnstone also recruited (from Scotland, as with Colin) to cover sales and marketing – Buxton have tied up key positions and are ready to up the ante again in the second half of 2013.



ArborAles

Arbor Ales
Arbor are a brewery very much with an eye on the future, and having released more beers than ever north of the border, since January I can see where they are going. Beer is all about experimentation – and the great thing about trying new producers – as I did when I sampled Arbor’s Impy Stout (produced in collaboration with Raw Brewery), is the feeling of warm recognition when other beers subsequently creep into your drinking field of vision. For Edinburgh beer-fans, the April takeover at the Hanging Bat widened that field enormously, with crackers such as Goo Goo G’joob and the brilliant Lime in the Coconut. We’re a long way from their south-west base of operations, but so far this year, Arbor are spreading to all parts – and that is very much a good thing.



LondonFields

London Fields Brewery
Since opening for business in 2011, the London Fields Brewery have been firmly part of the resurgence in brewing in the other capital. As there are dozens of new producers in the city, with several in Hackney itself (where London Fields are located), they have needed to raise their game recently, just to maintain position in the pack. Although the beers have been well received – Shoreditch Triangle IPA is a cracker, for example – a recent foray into hosting the London’s Brewing event did not go well, and resulted in a fair bit of negative publicity. However, the intention was honourable (stepping in on behalf of the London Brewing Alliance); whether it has dented their momentum, or their enthusiasm for hosting further events, time will tell.



Hawkshead

Hawkshead Brewery
In the original post back in January, I mentioned Hawkshead as “having all the ingredients to become the kind of ‘big regional’ that everyone can aspire to.” I don’t know if that’s exactly what they have in mind, but for the time being, their size may preclude it. However, the compliment stands – Hawkshead produce some stunning beers, across the full range of the brewing spectrum. It’s been a quiet year so far for them (up here in Scotland, I mean), but I have no doubt there are some interesting beers coming out of their amazing Staveley beer hall. I suppose I should get off my backside and get down to their summer beer festival at the end of July, rather than waiting for them to come to me…



WilburWood

Great Yarmouth Brewing Co
Finally, I selected Great Yarmouth to be on the list purely because of the head brewer – Wil Wood, and what he had achieved at Fyne Ales. After taking the long journey from Argyll to East Anglia, I’d expected the beers from his new brewery to be just as good. However, what I wasn’t expecting was the reason behind the move. After only a few months, Great Yarmouth Brewing Co has (effectively) been wound up; it was a Trojan horse for the newly re-launched Lacon’s Brewery. This famous British company, a Norfolk institution, received a lot of publicity a few weeks ago, when the return was announced – but I’m not sure how many realised Wil’s new brewery was a directly-related dry-run. Well, Great Yarmouth’s loss is the whole of East Anglia’s gain – it looks like the suggestion to watch their progress was well-founded.

Breweries to watch out for in 2013…

Last year, right at the beginning of January, we posted a list of breweries to watch out for in 2012. Looking back, our overall pick to take that next step (Tempest Brewing Co) really had a spectacular twelve months, and many of our other choices also produced some fantastic beer. Despite the pressures of the recession and the Government’s overburdening legislation, the British brewing scene continues to be in good health – largely down to the skill, commitment and imagination of the men and women making our beer. Here, then, is our list of UK breweries who we think will move to that next level over the course of 2013…



SCOTLAND

Cromarty1

Cromarty Brewing Co
Looking over the names of the many breweries in Scotland, one stands out above all others with regard to sheer potential. Cromarty Brewing Company (only established at the beginning of last year) immediately put out some spellbinding beers in 2012. With kegging and bottling now on-line alongside their cask output, all the pieces are in place for Cromarty to have a breakout year. The only limit is how many hours Craig Middleton can fit into each day, as judging by beers like Rogue Wave, Red Rocker and AKA IPA, his talent is clearly beyond question. Cromarty are our tip for 2013.



arranlogo
Arran Brewery
In terms of sheer force of will, 2013 should belong to the Arran Brewery. At the back end of last year, they began expanding in a series of mergers and acquisitions that took everybody by surprise. First, they announced a £10m equity-raising share scheme. Then, MD Gerald Michaluk resurrected Beers of the World magazine. In November, Arran announced they had merged with the Isle of Skye Brewery. They then bought a distillery. Over the next few months, look for them to build a mainland bottling plant, begin exporting to Europe and the US, and then open the first in a series of beer bars in Glasgow. Operating on a policy of ‘nothing ventured, nothing gained’, Arran are all-in for 2013.



Knops
Knops Beer Co/Archerfield Fine Ales
For the past three years, Bob Knops has been labouring to get his range of beers produced at TSA’s contractor plant in Throsk. After a prolonged period of ups and downs, 2013 should see a massive leap upwards for Knops Beer, as they fly the nest to regroup in East Lothian. There, they will be part of the enormous new Archerfield Estate project at Lennoxlove House – which includes an on-site microbrewery of its own, within the walled garden. Bob will be there as head brewer, and with two labels to account for, not to mention his own kit to play with (finally), his imagination will no doubt run riot. Knops and Archerfield are definitely worth watching this year, once brewing comes on-line within the next couple of months.



Fallen
Fallen Brewing Co
From here, it looks as if one of the trends of this coming year could be contractor breweries opening their own facilities. Alongside Knops, another brewery set to do just that is Fallen Brewing Company, currently beginning work on a bespoke plant in the hills of Stirlingshire. Like Knops, Fallen initially contracted in Throsk, and founder Paul Fallen deserves plaudits for getting the hop-averse TSA to dry-pellet his beers, really transforming them over the various contracted brews. He got the keys to the new Kippen site in late November, so when the brewery opens in the spring, look for that immediate leap into the exciting, hop-forward beers that Paul wants to brew.



AlechemyBC
Alechemy Brewing
New breweries sometimes take a while to get going, and often need a grace period as they find their feet and hone recipes. Not so Alechemy, who blasted onto the Scottish beer scene in May last year with three of the best debut beers I’ve ever tasted. Since then, owner and brewer James Davies has showed no sign of slowing down. Recently he managed to get more fermenting vessels into his Livingston brewery, indicating that this year could see some really exciting things. Specifically, Alechemy’s programme of dry-hopping has been successful (even if Cairnpapple XH was too much for some), and if he ever puts out that Russian imperial stout, there’s an immediate beer of the year candidate. Now that Alechemy beers are being bottled as well, everything is there for them to become known throughout the UK.



brewdog-1
BrewDog
Has it really been five years since BrewDog appeared on the scene? As their profits continue to shoot skywards, last year their old Kessock plant was finally put out to pasture as the new BrewDog brewery was announced. It couldn’t come at a better time, as BrewDog delight and frustrate in equal measure (was it ever thus). Having a monolithic brewhouse should – should – enable them to brew more in-house, improve quality control and stabilise their core range, before another multitude of interesting beers appear. Alongside the incessant PR-charge, 2013 could be a vital year for the plc, as their army of punks look for payback (both literally and figuratively).



ENGLAND

buxton
Buxton Brewery
Imperial Black. Axe Edge. Tsar. Is there a brewery out there that produces three better big beers? Maybe – but does that brewery also produce consistently fantastic session cask ales, including the best bitter in England? The Buxton Brewery had an amazing year in 2012, working their way to an astonishing seventeen-strong line-up of regular beers. There’s nothing to suggest that this next year won’t be even better for them – few small teams around a brewery work as hard, or as creatively. Those who missed the Stockbridge Tap takeover back in June really, really missed out. Buxton Imperial Black is possibly the best cask beer I’ve ever had – there’s no other English brewery I look forward to watching as much over the course of 2013.



ArborAles
Arbor Ales
Our brewery watch-list for 2013 doesn’t just consist of those who we feel are ready to hit the big time. Arbor Ales are simply a brewery I’ve only just discovered, and really want to try more of. Based in the Lawrence Hill area of Bristol, their beers are now finding themselves in Edinburgh with some degree of regularity. The Mutiny Coconut Stout they made with Chesterfield’s Raw Brewing Company was wonderful, as was their own Imperial (or Impy) stout. With a 12bbl plant, they are the same size as Alechemy, and hopefully will be distributing their beers to Scotland for as long as I’m around to drink them. The fact that they also own two pubs is intriguing – is the small pubco another trend for the future?



LondonFields
London Fields Brewery
The London Fields Brewery opened for business in 2011, but already are on the verge of something really special. When they started, the London brewing resurgence was just taking hold – now there are dozens of new producers in the city, with several in Hackney itself (where London Fields are located). However, competition means that everyone has to up their game, and the beers I’ve had from LF recently have been superb – their single hop IPA series has been one of the best I’ve come across. As they continue to expand, 2013 could be their year.



Hawkshead
Hawkshead Brewery
Some of the breweries are in this list as they are just about to become more widely known, but the Hawkshead Brewery are undoubtedly on track to becoming a household name. As well as being one of the most consistent brewers in the UK, they also have a stunning brewery tap (surely the best in the country?), and put on a festival that I really want to finally get to. Windermere Pale is as good as golden session beer gets. Hawkshead have all the ingredients to become the kind of ‘big regional’ that everyone can aspire to.



WilburWood
Great Yarmouth Brewing Co
Finally, a brand new English brewery that could bolt out of the gates this year – the Great Yarmouth Brewing Company. Brainchild of ex-Fyne Ales head brewer Wil Wood, the new Norfolk operation will feature a signature range of hop-forward ales under the ‘Wilbur Wood’ label, including (and stop me if this sounds familiar, Fyne-fans) a 3.8% “thirst-quenching pale ale with a dry pine and citrus explosion from the Citra hop”. At the same time, Wil is also reviving a famous East Anglia name – literally – as he’s re-awakened the yeast strain used from 1956 by the defunct Lacons brewery. New and old, beers from Great Yarmouth that will definitely be worth seeking out.

The perils of the midweek beer festival…

Feeling a bit shaky this morning. Another fateful weekday drinking trip, led astray by the incredible range of beer on offer in Edinburgh. The evening started off, as always, with cultured discussion, before gradually sliding downhill to the inevitable homeward stagger across the Meadows. It’s all the fault of the Independent Beer Festival – organised to showcase the city’s pubs and British brewing, but with the side-effect of a Friday morning spent staring blankly at the monitor, struggling to focus.

The point things started to go southwards was, unsurprisingly, when the best beer of the night appeared. Camden Town’s King Crimson – a 6.5% red IPA inoculated with wild yeast and aged in red wine barrels. It appeared at Cloisters as their festival premiere release (every pub has one this weekend), and sold out in 55 minutes. More tart than sour, it was like drinking chilled, hop-laced, red wine. Really interesting.

Strong, too. This is the inherent ‘problem’ with the modern wave of breweries – they love to ramp up the old abv’s at every opportunity. As the midweek drinker discovers to their cost, what begins with a beautifully balanced Hawkshead Bitter invariably ends with a Hawkshead Brodies Prime Bladnoch – an 8.5% imperial stout, smooth as anything. It slips down like a tonic, warming as it goes – nothing that fills you with glowing sweetness can be bad for you, surely?

It can, of course – and as the evening progresses, you reach the point of no return where the hangover is guaranteed. As the scrappy terriers in the Bow nip at each other, and the testicle-based anecdotes come one after the other (between you and me, never lean against the barrel table in the Blue Blazer – others have ‘leaned’ there previously), the senses become dulled, the consequences inevitable.

Still – today is Friday. Dust yourself down, hangover cure of choice to hand. More great beer is out there today – and on Saturday. And Sunday. There’s never been a better time to be a beer drinker. Get out there and find out why. If you overdo it – well, it’s the weekend tomorrow…



The Edinburgh Independents’ Beer Festival continues at eight pubs across the city until Sunday. Check out our preview for more details. On Saturday, I’ll be visiting each pub in turn over the course of the day, so check back later in the weekend for our pictorial tour of the city!

FyneFest 2011

Beer festivals needn’t always take place in musty town halls on the local high street. Rather than bringing the beer to the punters, some brewers make the drinkers do the legwork. Argyll’s Fyne Ales are based on a farm at the head of Loch Fyne, and when you have surroundings like that it makes sense to get people along to enjoy it. The debut FyneFest took place last year, and was greeted with glorious sunshine. Fyne not only serve their own beer at the event, some top quality English brewers supply their products as well. If that weren’t enough, Fyne Ales also brew a special beer for the event. Last year this was Jarl, which has since taken the beer world by storm.

As Cairndow is, let’s be honest, miles from anywhere, camping is the only option to enjoy the festival for a decent length of time. After arriving at the well-marshaled event, we managed to get the tent up in a record time of about forty-five minutes. With two fields set aside for people staying over, there was plenty of room to find a decent spot. The beer was being served inside a giant marquee, so a quick wander through the field and it was time for a well-earned pint. The new FyneFest beer for 2011 was Fiddler’s Gold, a hoppy 4.3% golden ale – which is exactly what Fyne do best. Very drinkable, the American hops give it a dry bitterness similar to Jarl, although with a touch less grapefruit.

The distinctive pump clips of Thornbridge were proudly sitting at one end of the temporary bar in the beer tent, so next up I went for Ashford (4.2%), an American-style brown ale. Caramel in colour, with plenty on the taste as well, it had a lovely fruitiness leading into a bitter finish. Thornbridge get fantastic balance into their beer, none more so than their new 6.2% porter Evenlode (pictured below is the ‘half’ that I got from the generous bar staff). This was my beer of the day – absolutely stunning roasty malt porter, so drinkable for such a session-slaying abv. Great bitter finish, but so tremendously smooth.

Other things on my menu were Hawkshead Cumbrian 5 Hop (5.0%), a citrus-lover’s dream containing Fuggles, Golding, Bramling Cross, Citra and Amarillo. The Citra stood out, but the other hops really worked well to give a big zesty hop flavour. Other picks were the Whim/Marble collaboration Utopia (5.1%), another two Thornbridge beers – Hopton and St Petersburg, and another dark corker from the hosts, Fyne Ales Sublime Stout (6.8%) – a smooth, malty fruit bomb, with a really mellow finish.

So a great time was had by all, the beers were in perfect condition, it was fantastic to see so many other great British brewers present – many that don’t feature in Scotland all that often. Hopefully everyone who attended had a great time, there were still plenty of people carrying on into Sunday. Many thanks to Jamie and the rest of the Fyne Ales crew for hosting, and hopefully next year the weather will help to get everyone back for more…

Fyne Ales website
Other Scottish bloggers were in attendance, of course – check out the reports from the Beer Monkey and I Might Have a Glass of Beer



BeerCast #3 – Northern Charms

For the next stage of the global beer adventure, it seems reasonable to move the short distance over the southern uplands into England. English beer is all about tradition – even if the specific brewery is young, the methods used or the types of ales produced will probably have echoes of a far older time. With that in mind our third BeerCast takes in some classic varieties of English brews – Bitter, Golden Ale, India Pale Ale, and…er…a raisin beer…


1. Bluebird Bitter (4.2%abv)
The Coniston Brewery, Cumbria.
500ml glass bottle

Opened in 1995 behind a picturesque Lakeland pub, the Coniston brewery have already won numerous awards. Part of the secret might be the water they use, which comes from the surrounding Cumbrian fells. Located in the Furness region of the mountainous county, Coniston gained an unfortunate notoriety in 1967 when the intrepid Donald Campbell died on the nearby lake attempting to break his own world waterspeed record. The name of his ill-fated ship was the Bluebird, and it seems fitting the local brewery would take the name for it’s most prized beer. Bluebird Bitter was the Supreme Champion beer of Britain in 1998, as voted at the CAMRA British Beer Festival of that year (co-incidentally the 2007 festival is due to take place this week). The Coniston Brewery will probably be there, aiming for glory once more.

What They Say“Supreme Champion Beer of Britain 1998, a good session ale with a golden colour and a light, clean, quality taste” [Coniston Brewery]. “It has a massive orange fruit aroma from the challenger hops, balanced by biscuity malt. The tangy fruit lingers on the back of the tongue until it develops a hint of orange liqueur. It is, quite simply, a wonderful beer.” [Roger Protz, esteemed beer writer, CAMRA big-cheese and compiler of the Good Beer Guide].

What We Say
Richard – Very nice – light, hoppy, orangey – it tastes fantastic 8
Shovels – This is a very tasty session bitter with a nice colour 8


2. Daleside IPA (4.5%abv)
The Daleside Brewery, Harrogate, North Yorkshire.
500ml glass bottle

Despite the name, India Pale Ale is the quintessential English beer. First produced in London and the brewing mega-hub of Burton-on-Trent for the colonial market, the high alcohol and hop count aided preservation on the long voyage to India and beyond. Traditionally they have high bitter and malty tastes, with plenty of sharp citrus fruits cutting through. This particular IPA is produced specially for a small Lancashire supermarket chain – but the Daleside brewery, founded in the genteel North Yorkshire spa town of Harrogate, produce three draft and seven bottled beers. Another relatively recent company, they moved to their current premises in 1992, and pride themselves on the variety of hops they use – 18 to be exact.

What They Say“This IPA has a fruity malty finish, with aromas of flowers and toast, and plenty of hops.” [RateBeer.com].

What We Say
Richard – This is a nice summery outdoorsy IPA 8
Shovels – More character than the Bluebird, but it’s just as good 8


3. Lakeland Gold (4.4%abv)
The Hawkshead Brewery, Hawkshead & Staveley, Cumbria.
500ml glass bottle

Moving on to beer three, which is an example of another English staple – the Golden Ale. Hawkshead Lakeland Gold is a less malty, more hoppy number from a Cumbrian company started by a BCC journalist who decided on a change of career. Begun in a listed barn near the village of Hawkshead by Esthwaite Water, they have now begun operations in a 20 barrel plant at the larger town of Staveley. Also on that site is a Beer Hall, containing the brewery tap, a sampling room, visitor centre and a beer shop selling all varieties of local ale. With noble organisation, their official website has a list of every pub in the Lakes that serves their beers – handy for fans of their brews. But what will the two-man panel make of it?

What They Say“A Golden Ale. Hoppy and uncompromisingly bitter with complex fruit flavours from the blending of a modern English hop, First Gold, with an American, Cascade.” [Hawkshead Brewery]. “A hoppy, bitter golden ale with complex fruit flavours. Champion Best Bitter at the 2005 SIBA National Awards.” [Good Beer Guide].

What We Say
Richard – Not easy to knock back, you have to work for it 7
Shovels – Too bitter and no all-round satisfying taste 4


4. Cain’s Fine Raisin Beer (5%abv)
Cain’s Brewery, Liverpool.
500ml glass bottle

The traditional English beer theme ends here, with our fourth teaser from the skilled people at Liverpool’s largest brewery, Cain’s. Finest Raisin Ale is very simple – a choice light-coloured hoppy beer, with a great big pile of Californian raisins added. This gives a fascinating fruity beer with a deep purple colour. An idea of the current owners, the Dusanj brothers – who rescured the brewery from closure in 2002, and became the first Indian-born owners of a British beer company. Cain’s really is a Liverpool landmark, having been opened by Irish immigrant Robert Cain in 1858. Today, their latest expat owners sit proudly behind a producer that rolls out 120 million pints a year. Each month they release a speciality ale – and every November it’s the Raisin Beer. It’s very popular – winning the Tesco Autumn Beer Challenge in 2003, and the honour of being the ‘Official Beer of Liverpool 2008 – European City of Culture’.

What They Say“A rich, fruity amber ale infused with succulent Californian raisins. Choicest hops give depth, density and complexity.” [Cain’s official website].

What We Say
Richard – Fruity raisins and the oaty/malty tastes – it’s like muesli 7
Shovels – Reminds me of prune juice – which is not a good thing 5

BeerCast panel verdict

Coniston Bluebird – 16/20
Daleside IPA – 16/20
Cain’s Fine Raisin Beer – 12/20
Hawkshead Lakeland Gold – 11/20


Panellists – (from left) Shovels, Richard

 

 

We’ll be back in a couple of weeks with Episode 4 – four beers from the South of England, tested by a panel of six BeerCasters. Stay tuned for details…and please leave us comments on the blog or iTunes, or emails. Cheers!