Tag Archives: Fallen Brewing Co

Beer of the Week – Fallen Brewing Platform C

Another Friday and another beer recommendation from north of the border. With so many breweries in Scotland these days (over 150 at least) there is just so much to tempt your hard-earned cash with. So the best advice I can give is go at it in bite-sized chunks. That’s why at the end of every week throughout this year I’ll be shining the spotlight on a beer I believe is criminally unsung and deserves greater praise.

So let’s take a look at the style that dragged craft beer into the supermarket aisles if not fully into the public consciousness (yet) – the India Pale Ale. There are plenty of IPAs in Scotland now, which is great to see but can leave you staring at the ‘HOPS’ shelf with a puzzled expression on your face – even if you ignore all the versions of the style from the rest of the UK, the United States and everywhere else. For now, just pick this one – Fallen Platform C. You’ll be glad you did.

32. Platform C (6.3%)
Fallen Brewing, Kippen, Stirlingshire
Style: India Pale Ale
330ml can

Pick it up here:
At Drinkmonger’s online shop (as individual 330ml cans)

A canned 6% IPA may not seem like the obvious beer to come out of central Stirlingshire, but Paul Fallen and his team are brewing up a storm these days. They also know when they are on to a good thing, and this one-time seasonal blasted into their regular lineup due to the feedback it received. Well, here’s some more. Platform C is the best IPA in Scotland at the moment in my eyes, ahead of AKA, Punk, Tempest’s amazing range and the rest. They are all fighting over second.

These kinds of beers depend on the hopload getting to you in perfect balance and with a huge kick of bitterness – that’s what US IPA is all about. Platform C brings the former with the combination of Magnum, Citra, Cascade, Columbus and Mosaic and really tastes every inch of its 70 IBU. It is equal parts citrus, tropical and stone fruit and just as much that dank, sticky quality the best US taproom IPAs have, with a long-lasting finish and a kick of booze in the tail. If you’ve never tried Fallen’s Platform C then it’s likely the best Scottish beer you’ve yet to taste. It’s that simple.

Beer of the Week Series:
1. Fyne Ales Highlander
2. Swannay Old Norway
3. Broughton Old Jock
4. Traquair House Ale
5. Tempest Easy Livin Pils
6. Cromarty Brewed Awakening
7. Fallen Chew Chew
8. Black Isle Hibernator
9. Isle of Skye Red
10. Harviestoun Old Engine Oil Engineer’s Reserve
11. Orkney Skull Splitter
12. Windswept Wolf
13. Kelburn Dark Moor
14. Alechemy 5ive Sisters
15. Loch Ness Light Ness
16. St Andrews Eighty Bob
17. Harviestoun The Ridge
18. Orkney Dark Island
19. Williams Bros Seven Giraffes
20. Cairngorm Black Gold
21. Strathaven Craigmill Mild
22. Black Isle Red Kite
23. Spey Valley Spey Stout
24. Top Out Schmankerl
25. Cross Borders Braw
26. Williams Bros Midnight Sun
27. BrewDog Kingpin
28. Fyne Ales Hurricane Jack
29. Deeside MacBeth
30. Drygate Ax Man Red Rye IPA
31. Swannay Orkney Session

Beer of the Week – Fallen Chew Chew

As the week draws to a close it is time to focus attention once more on another unsung hero of Scottish brewing. This weekly series exists to look at those beers – new and old – that deserve to be on your drinking radar, so that you can hopefully seek them out and discover another classic (if you haven’t managed to try them already, of course). For this entry, the seventh in the series, I’m casting the spotlight not towards a noble 80/- or Scotch Ale but something much more of the moment – a stout that embraces added ingredients…and aluminium.

Since Paul Fallen took back his brand from contract-brewing at Traditional Scottish Ales in Throsk and installed his own kit in an old station building near Kippen he has really shown what he is capable of. You get the impression that the frustration of relying on someone else weighed heavy on him, and released from all of that the gloves have well and truly come off. That switch occurred nearly three years ago, and a lot has happened since – not least of which the decision to move away from glass and install a canning line. This is the latest box to be ticked at Fallen; since the start of the year the cans have taken the place of bottles – and it is the call of the ringpull that leads to a beer that needs to be in your collection – Fallen Chew Chew.


7. Chew Chew (6.0%)
Fallen Brewing Co, Kippen, Stirlingshire
Style: Milk Stout
330 ml can

Actually it doesn’t really matter how it comes to you – bottles of Chew Chew are still available at the moment (check the link to Alesela at the end of this short piece). Chew Chew could be packaged in tupperware and it would still be amazing. You may not get to taste many salted caramel milk stouts – hell, you may not want to – but this beer succeeds (in fact it more than succeeds) because of the balance of flavours in has. And that is the reason why we all drink beer, irrespective of what goes into it and what you pour it out from.

The key to Chew Chew is that its not overly sweet – which is one heck of an achievement given it is brewed with dark Belgian candi syrup and lactose. There are two things that make this happen – the first is the Hebridean sea salt, which really comes out on the initial flavour and offsets the first whack of the sugars. Then you have the unheralded flaked oats that push the body of the beer into a creaminess to help the milk sugars but beef up the entire thing as you drink it. This is a beer, above all, about balance – in fact, it is a lesson in the mastery of balance. To get all of these additions singing is a stunning achievement – and Fallen Chew Chew is a stunning beer.

Pick it up here:
At Online via Alesela (as individual 330ml cans or 500ml bottles)

Beer of the Week Series:
1. Fyne Ales Highlander
2. Swannay Old Norway
3. Broughton Old Jock
4. Traquair House Ale
5. Tempest Easy Livin Pils
6. Cromarty Brewed Awakening

Breweries to Watch 2013 – five months on…

At the beginning of January, just as the year started, I posted a list of British breweries to watch out for in 2013. Despite the ongoing financial pressures, the scene here is flourishing – more breweries are opening now than ever (in living memory, at least). Having said that, it’s still a tough industry in which to survive, of course – requiring long hours, hard work, and the ability to fend off constant demands of needy bloggers. Speaking of which, five months down the line from the original post, it’s time to check back with those eleven breweries, and see how they have been doing, as we approach the halfway point of the year…



SCOTLAND

Cromarty1

Cromarty Brewing Co
I pegged Cromarty Brewing Company as the brewery to watch this year, and so far Craig Middleton hasn’t let us down. His latest effort rolled off the production line on the Black Isle last week – a 2%, triple C-hopped, ‘un-stout’ (joining in with one of the brewing trends of the year; beers between 2 and 3%). Keeping up with demand has been Craig’s biggest problem to date – so the recent arrival of two 32hl and two 16hl conditioning tanks is great news for Cromarty fans. Having effectively doubled capacity at the brewery, Craig should now be set to keep a regular stock in place, secure even more accounts, and rightfully become known throughout the UK.



arranlogo

Arran Brewery
Arran Brewery MD Gerald Michaluk went all-in for 2013, having announced a merger with the Isle of Skye Brewery, and a huge expansion plan that included a mainland bottling plant, distillery and series of bespoke bars. However, the wheels came off in fairly spectacular fashion when the Scottish Government turned down his FPMC grant application. After issuing a few withering press releases, Gerald re-grouped and is blazing ahead with parts of the project anyway – although the Skye merger is off, the Falkirk Brewery is set to continue. Also, Arran cider will soon appear, as will an historic Iron Age ale, and a whey wine. Distribution has begun to the continent, and Arran have also recently become the first UK brewery (to my knowledge) to begin producing sake. ‘Nothing ventured, nothing gained’ still holds sway on Arran, clearly.



Knops

Knops Beer Co/Archerfield Fine Ales
I predicted a massive leap upwards for Bob Knops this year, as back in January he was waiting for the Archerfield Estate project to come on-line in East Lothian (with some nervousness, no doubt). Five months down the line, the brewery is there, the people are rolling in, and the beers are heading in the opposite direction. As well as the core range, for the first time in a while Knops Beer Co released a new beer under their own label; the Spring-reveal of Knops ‘Premier Bru’. The creativity that had been kept in check for so long due to the vagaries of contracting has finally being released. With a stable base from which to build – and a huge amount of physical space in which to do so – Knops are really starting to kick on and should have a hugely productive year from here onwards.



Fallen

Fallen Brewing Co
Speaking of contractor breweries, one of the half-dozen that operate in Scotland at the moment are the Fallen Brewing Company; another one-man operation getting beers out via the TSA plant in Throsk. At the moment, Paul Fallen is still in the process of getting his own brewery established – since the new year, the business plan has gone out and the multi-stranded planning applications are nestling in the appropriate pigeon-holes. Once everything comes together, expect a flood of beers to come from the Kippen plant – until then, keep watching Paul’s Twitter feed.



AlechemyBC

Alechemy Brewing
Livingston’s Alechemy Brewing Co blasted on to the scene last spring, and over the first few months of this year they show absolutely no signs of slowing down. Owner James Davies can’t get new fermenting vessels in fast enough, and has taken on new members of staff to help with the near-incessant demand. Currently, the expanded Alechemy team are busy sourcing kegging equipment to begin taking their beer in yet another direction (bottled beer having appeared a few months ago). With house beers and dedicated Alechemy taps appearing all over Edinburgh (the latest being the Bow Bar), and custom beers also increasingly prevalent – look for Alechemy’s beers to appear in England with increasing regularity. They have also even re-branded their Twitter feed



brewdog-1

BrewDog
2013 could become the key year for BrewDog, as the grace period following the opening of the new Ellon plant draws to a close, and the legions of punks look for something tangible to result. Or maybe they don’t, as the enjoyable/infuriating marketing juggernaut rolls on – spearheaded by the recently re-announced BrewDog TV show. Will ‘BrewDogs’ catapult James and Martin into the mainstream they so desperately crave? Beer releases this year have been largely positive so far, and the subtle re-shuffling of lines has moved Alice Porter and Jackhammer more towards the forefront. Similarly, will the next few months enable BrewDog to move more into more established markets, to cash in on the success of their bars? Only time will tell. Meanwhile, yesterday’s tweet from James Watt hints at yet more to come – something concrete? Or PR fluff?



ENGLAND

buxton

Buxton Brewery
Over the other side of the border, the pick of English breweries to look out for this year (in January, at any rate) was Buxton. That was largely down to their breakout 2012 – building up to a seventeen-strong lineup, with a double-figure number of standouts. Pound for pound (or barrel for barrel, really) there are few better British breweries out there. So, this year, there may have been cause for concern when they lost James Kemp, their head brewer, in April. But stepping into the Peak District Purofort’s is Colin Stronge, ex-Black Isle and Marble, and one of the most riotously inventive brewers out there. With Denis ‘Anorak’ Johnstone also recruited (from Scotland, as with Colin) to cover sales and marketing – Buxton have tied up key positions and are ready to up the ante again in the second half of 2013.



ArborAles

Arbor Ales
Arbor are a brewery very much with an eye on the future, and having released more beers than ever north of the border, since January I can see where they are going. Beer is all about experimentation – and the great thing about trying new producers – as I did when I sampled Arbor’s Impy Stout (produced in collaboration with Raw Brewery), is the feeling of warm recognition when other beers subsequently creep into your drinking field of vision. For Edinburgh beer-fans, the April takeover at the Hanging Bat widened that field enormously, with crackers such as Goo Goo G’joob and the brilliant Lime in the Coconut. We’re a long way from their south-west base of operations, but so far this year, Arbor are spreading to all parts – and that is very much a good thing.



LondonFields

London Fields Brewery
Since opening for business in 2011, the London Fields Brewery have been firmly part of the resurgence in brewing in the other capital. As there are dozens of new producers in the city, with several in Hackney itself (where London Fields are located), they have needed to raise their game recently, just to maintain position in the pack. Although the beers have been well received – Shoreditch Triangle IPA is a cracker, for example – a recent foray into hosting the London’s Brewing event did not go well, and resulted in a fair bit of negative publicity. However, the intention was honourable (stepping in on behalf of the London Brewing Alliance); whether it has dented their momentum, or their enthusiasm for hosting further events, time will tell.



Hawkshead

Hawkshead Brewery
In the original post back in January, I mentioned Hawkshead as “having all the ingredients to become the kind of ‘big regional’ that everyone can aspire to.” I don’t know if that’s exactly what they have in mind, but for the time being, their size may preclude it. However, the compliment stands – Hawkshead produce some stunning beers, across the full range of the brewing spectrum. It’s been a quiet year so far for them (up here in Scotland, I mean), but I have no doubt there are some interesting beers coming out of their amazing Staveley beer hall. I suppose I should get off my backside and get down to their summer beer festival at the end of July, rather than waiting for them to come to me…



WilburWood

Great Yarmouth Brewing Co
Finally, I selected Great Yarmouth to be on the list purely because of the head brewer – Wil Wood, and what he had achieved at Fyne Ales. After taking the long journey from Argyll to East Anglia, I’d expected the beers from his new brewery to be just as good. However, what I wasn’t expecting was the reason behind the move. After only a few months, Great Yarmouth Brewing Co has (effectively) been wound up; it was a Trojan horse for the newly re-launched Lacon’s Brewery. This famous British company, a Norfolk institution, received a lot of publicity a few weeks ago, when the return was announced – but I’m not sure how many realised Wil’s new brewery was a directly-related dry-run. Well, Great Yarmouth’s loss is the whole of East Anglia’s gain – it looks like the suggestion to watch their progress was well-founded.

Breweries to watch out for in 2013…

Last year, right at the beginning of January, we posted a list of breweries to watch out for in 2012. Looking back, our overall pick to take that next step (Tempest Brewing Co) really had a spectacular twelve months, and many of our other choices also produced some fantastic beer. Despite the pressures of the recession and the Government’s overburdening legislation, the British brewing scene continues to be in good health – largely down to the skill, commitment and imagination of the men and women making our beer. Here, then, is our list of UK breweries who we think will move to that next level over the course of 2013…



SCOTLAND

Cromarty1

Cromarty Brewing Co
Looking over the names of the many breweries in Scotland, one stands out above all others with regard to sheer potential. Cromarty Brewing Company (only established at the beginning of last year) immediately put out some spellbinding beers in 2012. With kegging and bottling now on-line alongside their cask output, all the pieces are in place for Cromarty to have a breakout year. The only limit is how many hours Craig Middleton can fit into each day, as judging by beers like Rogue Wave, Red Rocker and AKA IPA, his talent is clearly beyond question. Cromarty are our tip for 2013.



arranlogo
Arran Brewery
In terms of sheer force of will, 2013 should belong to the Arran Brewery. At the back end of last year, they began expanding in a series of mergers and acquisitions that took everybody by surprise. First, they announced a £10m equity-raising share scheme. Then, MD Gerald Michaluk resurrected Beers of the World magazine. In November, Arran announced they had merged with the Isle of Skye Brewery. They then bought a distillery. Over the next few months, look for them to build a mainland bottling plant, begin exporting to Europe and the US, and then open the first in a series of beer bars in Glasgow. Operating on a policy of ‘nothing ventured, nothing gained’, Arran are all-in for 2013.



Knops
Knops Beer Co/Archerfield Fine Ales
For the past three years, Bob Knops has been labouring to get his range of beers produced at TSA’s contractor plant in Throsk. After a prolonged period of ups and downs, 2013 should see a massive leap upwards for Knops Beer, as they fly the nest to regroup in East Lothian. There, they will be part of the enormous new Archerfield Estate project at Lennoxlove House – which includes an on-site microbrewery of its own, within the walled garden. Bob will be there as head brewer, and with two labels to account for, not to mention his own kit to play with (finally), his imagination will no doubt run riot. Knops and Archerfield are definitely worth watching this year, once brewing comes on-line within the next couple of months.



Fallen
Fallen Brewing Co
From here, it looks as if one of the trends of this coming year could be contractor breweries opening their own facilities. Alongside Knops, another brewery set to do just that is Fallen Brewing Company, currently beginning work on a bespoke plant in the hills of Stirlingshire. Like Knops, Fallen initially contracted in Throsk, and founder Paul Fallen deserves plaudits for getting the hop-averse TSA to dry-pellet his beers, really transforming them over the various contracted brews. He got the keys to the new Kippen site in late November, so when the brewery opens in the spring, look for that immediate leap into the exciting, hop-forward beers that Paul wants to brew.



AlechemyBC
Alechemy Brewing
New breweries sometimes take a while to get going, and often need a grace period as they find their feet and hone recipes. Not so Alechemy, who blasted onto the Scottish beer scene in May last year with three of the best debut beers I’ve ever tasted. Since then, owner and brewer James Davies has showed no sign of slowing down. Recently he managed to get more fermenting vessels into his Livingston brewery, indicating that this year could see some really exciting things. Specifically, Alechemy’s programme of dry-hopping has been successful (even if Cairnpapple XH was too much for some), and if he ever puts out that Russian imperial stout, there’s an immediate beer of the year candidate. Now that Alechemy beers are being bottled as well, everything is there for them to become known throughout the UK.



brewdog-1
BrewDog
Has it really been five years since BrewDog appeared on the scene? As their profits continue to shoot skywards, last year their old Kessock plant was finally put out to pasture as the new BrewDog brewery was announced. It couldn’t come at a better time, as BrewDog delight and frustrate in equal measure (was it ever thus). Having a monolithic brewhouse should – should – enable them to brew more in-house, improve quality control and stabilise their core range, before another multitude of interesting beers appear. Alongside the incessant PR-charge, 2013 could be a vital year for the plc, as their army of punks look for payback (both literally and figuratively).



ENGLAND

buxton
Buxton Brewery
Imperial Black. Axe Edge. Tsar. Is there a brewery out there that produces three better big beers? Maybe – but does that brewery also produce consistently fantastic session cask ales, including the best bitter in England? The Buxton Brewery had an amazing year in 2012, working their way to an astonishing seventeen-strong line-up of regular beers. There’s nothing to suggest that this next year won’t be even better for them – few small teams around a brewery work as hard, or as creatively. Those who missed the Stockbridge Tap takeover back in June really, really missed out. Buxton Imperial Black is possibly the best cask beer I’ve ever had – there’s no other English brewery I look forward to watching as much over the course of 2013.



ArborAles
Arbor Ales
Our brewery watch-list for 2013 doesn’t just consist of those who we feel are ready to hit the big time. Arbor Ales are simply a brewery I’ve only just discovered, and really want to try more of. Based in the Lawrence Hill area of Bristol, their beers are now finding themselves in Edinburgh with some degree of regularity. The Mutiny Coconut Stout they made with Chesterfield’s Raw Brewing Company was wonderful, as was their own Imperial (or Impy) stout. With a 12bbl plant, they are the same size as Alechemy, and hopefully will be distributing their beers to Scotland for as long as I’m around to drink them. The fact that they also own two pubs is intriguing – is the small pubco another trend for the future?



LondonFields
London Fields Brewery
The London Fields Brewery opened for business in 2011, but already are on the verge of something really special. When they started, the London brewing resurgence was just taking hold – now there are dozens of new producers in the city, with several in Hackney itself (where London Fields are located). However, competition means that everyone has to up their game, and the beers I’ve had from LF recently have been superb – their single hop IPA series has been one of the best I’ve come across. As they continue to expand, 2013 could be their year.



Hawkshead
Hawkshead Brewery
Some of the breweries are in this list as they are just about to become more widely known, but the Hawkshead Brewery are undoubtedly on track to becoming a household name. As well as being one of the most consistent brewers in the UK, they also have a stunning brewery tap (surely the best in the country?), and put on a festival that I really want to finally get to. Windermere Pale is as good as golden session beer gets. Hawkshead have all the ingredients to become the kind of ‘big regional’ that everyone can aspire to.



WilburWood
Great Yarmouth Brewing Co
Finally, a brand new English brewery that could bolt out of the gates this year – the Great Yarmouth Brewing Company. Brainchild of ex-Fyne Ales head brewer Wil Wood, the new Norfolk operation will feature a signature range of hop-forward ales under the ‘Wilbur Wood’ label, including (and stop me if this sounds familiar, Fyne-fans) a 3.8% “thirst-quenching pale ale with a dry pine and citrus explosion from the Citra hop”. At the same time, Wil is also reviving a famous East Anglia name – literally – as he’s re-awakened the yeast strain used from 1956 by the defunct Lacons brewery. New and old, beers from Great Yarmouth that will definitely be worth seeking out.

New beers from Fallen Brewing Co

Three months ago, we interviewed Paul Fallen – the man behind Fallen Brewing Company – as his new start-up operation was about to receive their first contracted run of beer. Produced at the Traditional Scottish Ales facility in Throsk, the debut release was a 5% peat-smoked porter (Blackhouse) – an unusual launch style in a market usually tested by Pale and Golden Ales. As it happens, these two types of beer were next on Paul’s list (together with an amber ale, which is hitting the bottle shops as we speak).

Tasting the first beers from a new brewery who contracts to somebody else is always a tricky prospect for the reviewer. Brewers are, by their nature, perfectionists – the good ones, at least – and are rarely completely satisfied with the first results. But, as they attempt to build a brand, the casks/bottles have to be released into the market. It must be agonising, knowing that drinkers’ first impressions can be vital as to whether they will then return for a second pint, or buy some more bottles on their next shopping trip.

Blackhouse – ‘crafted using a blend of old and new, dark and light’ is, as you’d expect, the colour of a cloudless night in the Western Isles. The aroma is pretty much all phenolic peat, as the smoked malt comes out above everything else. It’s not intense though, and neither is the flavour – the peaty edge leads into a liquorice aftertaste, which combine to form an earthy, liquorice root flavour. It’s good, and noticeably different to the other peat-smoked beer recently released in Scotland – Old Worthy Pale Ale (which, of course, is not a porter).

Grapevine is a 5.4% Pale Ale, intriguingly named in honour of the largest grapevine in the world (all 5,000 square feet of it), that apparently used to exist near Stirling. Brewed by TSA with Magnum, Motueka and New Zealand-grown Cascade, it’s an NZPA, and has a fair amount of orange citrus about it. There’s also a slight honeyish element, and an evident malt profile, that comes through and takes over the finish. Chatting to Paul, I know he was after more hops in the Grapevine, so expect future versions to have more of that Kiwi citrus.

The final beer we got to try was Odyssey, a 4.1% golden ale. Billed as ‘an ale for lager lovers or a lager for ale lovers’ these kind of ‘tweener beers can sometimes find themselves stuck somewhere in the middle. Going for the ‘ale for lager lovers’ angle, at cellar temperature Odyssey has some faint citrus from the Cascade, but the spicy Saaz is overwhelmed by biscuity malt. Lager drinkers might not appreciate it, but the dry and very bitter finish was rather nice.

The fourth Fallen Brewing Company beer – Dragonfly – should be in the shops at the moment. As with the others, it is contract-brewed at TSA – but Paul is hopeful of constructing a bespoke brewery in Stirlingshire as soon as possible. Clearly, taking full control of his recipes is extremely important. When he manages to become fully independent, look for several interesting projects to begin…

New Scottish brewery – Fallen Brewing Co

2012 is shaping up to be the year that contract brewing exploded in Scotland – we can barely keep up with the new producers appearing here at the moment. There are many reasons why contracting is becoming so popular, but one of the more important – according to the man behind one of those cuckoo breweries* – is that it ‘de-risks’ the startup, allowing an easier way into production.

Paul Fallen is about to get his hands on the first run of his debut beer – Fallen Brewing Co’s Blackhouse (a 5% peat-smoked porter, no less), brewed in conjunction with Traditional Scottish Ales in Throsk. Giving over your ideas to someone else – at such an early stage in your business – must take a certain amount of courage, but the advantages are there, for those who are willing.

“The hardest thing for a start-up brewer is getting your foot in the door” explains Paul. “TSA have agreed to run approximately one 5bbl brew a week for me – I could have gone with a larger brewlength, but until you start, you don’t know how it’ll do.” This is the Catch-22 facing small contract brewers – how much do you go for? End up with too little, and struggle to build the brand, or get too much, and not be able to shift it?

It seems like Fallen (brewery and man both) already have most of the important details in place. The recipes for the core beers are all ready to go, and the long-term plan is to open a bespoke facility in Stirlingshire – an area with a few breweries already, but enough space to feature more. Also, crucially, Paul has signed up with a distribution company to get his beer out there – which will help tremendously.

After the first beer – which is being packaged at the moment – the subsequent brew runs will round out the rest of his core range. A 4.1% blonde ale (Odyssey) will follow, together with a 4.6% amber (Dragonfly) and a 5.4% kiwi-hopped pale ale (Grapevine – surely crying out for Nelson Sauvin). Keen to be as broad a church as possible, from the start Fallen Brewing Co will release their beer in cask, keg and bottle.

Following that, and down the line once his own brewery is on-line, a monthly special has been promised. “Freedom is the most exciting thing,” Paul continues “The specials will appear when the new brewery does, but they’ll be whatever my imagination can come up with.” So, it looks like Fallen are starting in the right way – build the core lineup, then unleash the creativity when the time is right.

Blackhouse smoked porter should be appearing in pubs very soon, so keep an eye out for Fallen Brewing Co beer – and, of course, we’ll be covering any official launch in the near future.



* Cuckoo Brewing has to be one of the most unsuitable terms in the industry. It implies some kind of malicious intent on the part of the newcomer. We’ve yet to hear of someone draining away their host’s beer and replacing it, leaving them unawares…